'‘what if?’ tracks

We are offering 12 different “What if” tracks; you choose ONE. We’ll present an idea, share a library of examples and assign a project that you’ll complete at camp and that you can use in your 2023 book or with your staff. Read the descriptions and choose the one that fits your yearbook passion (or your job on staff next year).  Courses are coded to help you choose:

adv   adviser                      c  coverage

beg  beginning staffer      d design

ex  experienced staffer     e eDesign

ed  editor                           l leadership

                                           p photography

What if we knew eDesign from A to Z?

Related Choice Sessions:
• Character Styles and Colors

• Photo management and tagging

• Using Canva

beg | ex e

Staffers will complete a spread template by choosing good photos, styling text, and learning about design hierarchy. Staffers will also learn to build modular pieces for use in their theme packet.  Uploading and tagging photos, name and spell check, along with efficiency tips and tricks will also be covered.

PROJECT:

Students will create a library of 6-8 mod templates, either copied from those shared in class  or ones they design from scratch. We will push them out to their book’s mod library after camp is over.  They can download PDFs and use those for their theme packets if they want.

What if Design was in your DNA?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Mod Design

• Hierarchy and scale

• Photo Packaging

beg | ex d

Some of us are born with a good sense of design. The rest of us learn it. Whether you are newer to design or are ready for the next step, learn how to develop your design skills and apply them so that you can create spreads that have people wondering if design is in your DNA.

PROJECT:

Creating and designing 1-2 spreads that demonstrate a sense of design principles such as voice, space, scale and relationship.

What if we made inspiration our own?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Magazine 101

• Headlines and subheads

• Dominance and reader-entry points

ex d

We'll look at ways to find inspiration, duplicate it, and then modify it so that it can be used as a yearbook spread, incorporating your school’s visual toolbox.

 

PROJECT:

You’ll create one spread of your choice: guts, interrupter, divider, opening, etc.

What if you could see a person through their eyes?

Related Choice Sessions:

• The art of interviewing

• Descriptive leads

• Taking environmental portraits

beg | p w

You love reading about people’s triumphs and defeats, their hopes and fears. Learn how to write compelling profiles others won’t be able to skip or put down. You will leave knowing how to effectively interview, write, and photograph profiles.

PROJECT:

You'll write a student profile (perhaps in two different formats) about someone at camp and take an environment portrait.

 

What if we told stories in yearbook with all the feels?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Telling stories with emotional impact

• The art of interviewing

• Quoting accurately and effectively

beg | ex w

When someone reads the copy in our yearbook, let’s grab their attention and hold it until the very end. Let’s have them want to read every word and react, whether they’re laughing or misty eyed. In this track, learn how to do all of that and more through the art of the interview and style of writing.

PROJECT:

1) An example of how to rework an article so that the impact is at the end and the whole story builds up to it. (either one you bring or one that is provided)

2. An example of a bad interview vs. a good interview and sample questions to take home to the staff.

3. A list of words or phrases to avoid when getting a quote from someone. Can be posted on the classroom wall.

What if we told stories without words?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Telling stories with emotional impact

• The art of interviewing

• Quoting accurately and effectively

beg | ex p

Our photos should be the heart of our yearbook spreads. And we all want to feature that one reader-stopping image. Let’s go a step further by shooting photos that will help to tell the complete story of a class, a game, or an event. Let’s tell the story visually first, and add the words later.

PROJECT:

Students will leave with a set of photo shoot planning documents that will be customizable to their own program. These documents can be used by all staffers to plan and shoot in academics, activities, and student life situations. They will also have the sports cheat sheets and hopefully a short photo story about camp.

What if we could anticipate and capture the unexpected?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Photoshop and your phone

• 360° of camera angles

• The right people at the right time

beg | ex p

So you spent all summer planning what and who to cover, but what if you are sitting in class and something amazing happens? Or what if you are not sure what makes a great story? Learn the tools you already have in your pocket to tell a story that no one planned on covering. Coverage should include everyday routines in addition to events, and we’ll teach you how to find them.

PROJECT:

Planning document/cheat sheet for unplanned photos:

In the classroom (what to look for, reaction shots, talking to the teacher, students involved, what to ask, settings for your phone/types of shots)

Outside the classroom (types of shots, types of questions, best people to talk to)

Outside of school (where to look, who to talk to)

What if you built a stash of mods to tell your stories?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Pitch me your photo

• Scale and hierarchy

• You can do better than a pie chart

beg | ex w

Giving your readers something new and interesting on every spread in your book is the result of flexible design, good reporting and rethinking your coverage. We’ll focus on mods that go beyond headshots and quotes, graphs and charts.

PROJECT:

Creating a mod library and a plan for innovative and varied storytelling will be the focus of this track.

What if yearbook was the funnest place to be?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Building partnerships at your school

• Using social media to build a yearbook presence

• How to celebrate your staff

ed 

The yearbook room should be the place people want to spend as much time as possible because of the environment you have created. In this course, we will practice things you can do as an editor to create a yerd culture of fun and family that inspires your staff to create the best yearbook possible.

PROJECT:

You will leave with a year-long calendar and plan that outlines specific dates and activities to build that yearbook culture.

What if we trained our staff to be THE squad?

Related Choice Sessions:

• What to do when you've taught your staff something and they still don't get it

• Designing a spread step-by-step

• Creating a culture of critiquing and sharing

adv ed 

One of the main roles of any leader is coaching and training fellow staff members on all things yearbook. We will discuss strategies on how to coach and train your staff in an engaging and constructive way so they learn the skills they need to be successful.

 

PROJECT:

You’ll leave with a curriculum plan and one engaging lesson that you can teach your staff when you get back to school.

What if your ladder could predict the future?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Theme-based mods

• Developing theme-based specialty spreads

• Deep dive into umbrella coverage

adv ed 

Okay. So we can’t actually predict the future, but we can plan for all possible outcomes if we start now. This track will help you look at the year ahead in ways you never have before. You’ll take your theme and brainstorm story ideas unique not only to the upcoming school year, but also to your theme. You’ll create a ladder with multiple layers of coverage, and maybe even try a new method of organization. Umbrella? Chronological? Traditional? Hybrid? The sky’s the limit.

PROJECT:

Ladder with unique spread topics, multiple layers of coverage, and theme-based stories from cover to cover.

What if we worked smarter, not harder?

Related Choice Sessions:

• Three common yearbook problems and how to get ahead of them

• The ultimate spread checklist

• Giving feedback

adv ed 

This strand focuses on the management of the entire yearbook process from theme selection through the spring supplement. Our goal is to help staffs develop systems to manage their workflow from the smallest mod to the way the theme is carried through the entire book. We will work to help advisers/editors see the ways that planning and organization up front goes a long way when a massive deadline is quickly approaching.

PROJECT:

Students/Advisers will leave with a “roadmap” for the school year, including plans for meeting each deadline, spread planners that have been tailored to match your staff’s theme and goals for the upcoming year, a variety of checklists to keep students on track, and strategies for how to give effective feedback to staffers and keep everyone working toward a common goal.